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    • #58411
      Tom Renick
      Participant

      Has anyone tried Evans Waterless Coolant for over heating, http://www.evanscoolant.com/, and with what result?

    • #66481

      I used this on my Tiger but the bad thing is it is really for a new built engine, IE no water in the system to start with , it seems to not like you to have water present. 8)

    • #66482
      Tom Renick
      Participant

      I have a newly built engine, no water. How well does the waterless coolant work to keep the engine heat down vs the usual water and antifreeze mixture?

    • #66483

      It helps, maybe 5 degrees but I would do the other things to help cooling most important is air flow and a good radiator.

    • #66485

      compare the spec sheets for evans and any of the conventional coolants and you will find there is very little difference. same freeze points, same boil points. you also need to use their purge product to clean the system but they don’t say anything about having to change all hoses if there has been conventional ethylene glycol in the engine. there also is no longer life of the product. the really scary thing is that the SDS doesn’t tell what evans uses to make the product. it’s a patented blend . the conventional ethylene glycol coolant provides the needed heat transfer for an automotive application and is available everywhere. it’s a matter of what you are willing to pay, availability of product and various other factors.

    • #66486
      quote 65beam:

      compare the spec sheets for evans and any of the conventional coolants and you will find there is very little difference. same freeze points, same boil points. you also need to use their purge product to clean the system but they don’t say anything about having to change all hoses if there has been conventional ethylene glycol in the engine. there also is no longer life of the product. the really scary thing is that the SDS doesn’t tell what evans uses to make the product. it’s a patented blend . the conventional ethylene glycol coolant provides the needed heat transfer for an automotive application and is available everywhere. it’s a matter of what you are willing to pay, availability of product and various other factors.

      Good point, if I had to guess the content of the Evans I would say it a blend of propylene and ethylene glycol, I do know that years ago a company came out with a environmentally safe coolant it was all propylene it is safer but still could kill you just like the ethylene. I wonder if the Evans stuff has any corrosion inhibitor? All ethylene base coolants have a very small amount of the compound Sodium Tolytrizole as an inhibitor.

    • #66487

      George,
      Evans only says that their product is blended using synthetic products. that makes me wonder since they skirt the issue of SDS guidelines. that is scary. propylene based products are also approved by the USDA for use in food plants and is also used in RV antifreeze and for coolants in industrial equipment. aliphatic carboxylates are now widely used for the corrosion inhibitor in ethylene glycol coolants.

    • #66844

      I think the only downside is that it is expensive compared to regular anti-freeze.

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